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[content_box_blue width=”75%”]If you really want to know the truth: why many common recovery programs fail and lesser-known METHODS that boost success, then this information is for you. I promise that the information on this page will EMPOWER you.[/content_box_blue]

– By A. Scott Roberts
M.S. studies in Rehabilitation Counseling
Addiction Specialist and Researcher

RE: How To Manage Any Addiction

Cheyenne Wy – People all over the world are literally spending thousands of dollars on luxurious rehabs, hundreds of dollars on self-help booklets and numerous counseling sessions, yet still unable to obtain long-term sobriety and abstinence.

Many studies and research reveals that the common “addiction recovery programs” have dismally low success rates… [content_box_blue width=”75%”]”Our whole treatment system with its innumerable therapies, armies of therapists, large and expensive programs, are founded on hunch, not evidence and not science.” (Source: Enoch Gordis, Director Of NIAAA)1[/content_box_blue] …but at the same time, there are handfuls of people discovering less-expensive, scientifically proven techniques that produce and sustain long-term change…

On this page you will discover what these methods are…

But first, you need to understand the core of the problem…[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]Lie 1toa11[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

It doesn’t matter what the addiction is. Lack of research-backed methods is a common cause…

There is a reason that many people fail to obtain long-term change…

Scientists know that the most common recovery programs have the lowest success rates.2, 3, 4 – The reason is because they go against research, evidence and data, as explained below… [content_box_blue width=”75%”]RE: The Rehab Model – Summary and the conclusion by William White: “Treating alcohol and other drug dependence solely through repeated episodes of detoxification and brief stabilization is clinically ineffective and constitutes a poor stewardship of personal and community resources…”

Additionally William White states that common acute recovery programs are expensive and ineffective and requires “a shift that will de-emphasize expensive, high intensity acute care and emphasize lower-intensity, lower cost and more enduring recovery support services.” (Source: William White, Senior Research Consultant at Chestnut Health Systems / Lighthouse Institute with a M.S. in Addiction Studies)5[/content_box_blue] IN FACT: According to some research, alcoholics that did NOT use common acute recovery programs showed greater improvement… [content_box_blue width=”75%”]“Alcoholics that were not treated in clinical trials show a greater improvement. Most of the improvement which is interpreted as treatment effect is not due to treatment.” (Source: Cutler & Fishbain: Are alcoholism treatments effective? The Project MATCH data)6[/content_box_blue] Other research suggests that some of the most common recovery programs show a 5-10% success rate.7,8,9  [content_box_blue width=”75%”]One of the more popular and common cited studies, followed addicts over the span of many years. Researchers discovered that after only 1 year, 20 percent of addicts were able maintain sobriety. But after 8 years, only 5 percent abstained (Source: Vaillant, The Natural History of Alcoholism).10[/content_box_blue] Why these terrible success rates?[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

Acute Recovery Is Scientifically Proven – NOT To Work

The most widely used model of addiction treatment (the Minnesota Model) was developed in 1946 and is still in practice today and has remained relatively unchanged, even though the last 50 years of research strongly supports its ineffectiveness.

While lesser-known and simple techniques have shown to boost success. Just adding key nutrients to an addicts diet, for example, has shown to correct the underlying biochemical deficiency that most addicts acquired from their addiction. [content_box_blue width=”75%”]In one study, 100 alcoholic patients that participated in a program that focused on restoring the biochemical change in the brain through eating key nutrients resulted in 85 percent of participants staying abstinent for 42 months (Source: Joan Matthews Larson, Ph.D).11[/content_box_blue] HOWEVER, this doesn’t mean you shouldn’t seek help, but that you can add simple evidence-based techniques to popular treatment options. [divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]Lie 2 Treatment[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]Research repeatedly shows that addicts who are able to “kick the habit” long-term, actually did it on their own without the use of expensive, luxurious and high-end treatment facilities.12, 13
[content_box_blue width=”75%”]Most who quit addictive behaviors do it on their own without expensive types treatment options or high-end recovery programs (Source: Sobell, Evaluating alcohol and drug abuse treatment effectiveness).14

One longitudinal study examined the prevalent heroin use among soldiers in Vietnam. This study revealed that when the soldiers returned home they gave up their addiction completely (Source: Robins, L. N., et al. Archives of General Psychiatry).15[/content_box_blue] Similarly, after years in the viscous cycle of relapse and experiencing substantial losses, addicts are found years later to have resolved their addictions, without expensive rehabs.[content_box_blue width=”75%”]The reason that most addicts find long-term sobriety on their own is because people do not like to be forced through treatment, they do not like confrontation and they do not like to be told what they can and cannot do (Source: Fillmore, Journal of studies on alcohol).16[/content_box_blue] In fact, research shows that conventional methods of trying to “help” an addict change, can actually cause greater problems… [content_box_blue width=”75%”]Confrontation shows an increase in an individual’s resistance to change. Problematic behaviors also increased during the confrontational periods of intervention (Source: Patterson, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology).17

People confronted to stop drinking, actually drank more. When less confrontation was used in recovery the less drinking addicts engaged in (Miller, The check-up: A model for early intervention in addictive behaviors).18[/content_box_blue] Confrontation, the use of power, or trying to pound sobriety into someone simply fails…

But these tactics are still used in some AA, NA groups and twelve-step programs. They call it “hot seat therapy” or “attack therapy.” [content_box_blue width=”75%”]There isn’t a single line of research showing successful clinical outcomes using the common approach to addiction treatment: confrontation, “hot seat therapy” or “attack therapy.” (Løberg, Addictive behaviors: Prevention and early intervention).19[/content_box_blue] Is it any wonder that AA reports a whopping 80 percent dropout rate in the first year?20

The way we talk to individuals about their addiction problem is vitally important to their success!

It is the motivational factors within an individual that produces long-term change…

And there are evidence-based techniques to usher this change… Included in the “Eliciting Motivation To Change” printable guide.

The way to truly help an addict may surprise you… [content_box_blue width=”75%”]The University of New Mexico conducted a study which revealed different approach with alcoholics. They discovered that successful outcomes and long-term sobriety actually stemmed from the level of empathy used. ( Source: Miller, Motivational Interviewing: Preparing People to Change).21[/content_box_blue] In fact, brief positive moments with an addicted loved one produces positive far-reaching effects… [content_box_blue width=”75%”]In fact empathy (not confrontation) used during recovery contributed to long-term positive effects up to 2 years following the intervention. These studies were repeated several times and the results were consistent. (Valle, Interpersonal functioning of alcoholism counselors and treatment outcome)22[/content_box_blue] Some people forget that sustained CHANGE requires personal DECISION! [divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

Long-term Sobriety Requires Developing Evidenec-based Coping Skills

Another essential component is developing proper coping skills to help manage cravings and urges.

Research shows that environmental cues actually spikes dopamine in the brain, resulting in a seductive pull and desire for your drug of choice. [content_box_blue width=”75%”]Dr. Childress, psychiatrist and researcher, used PET scans on participants to view neural activity in their brain. What she found was that the addict’s brain actually spiked dopamine when they were experiencing a trigger. She stated that this spike in chemicals was “similar to a small does of the drug itself, that is why some people report tasting the drug in the back of their throats, even though they really haven’t taken any.”

She also tells us that the trigger “is a primer, a seductive pull.” This trigger that addicts experience actually gives them a small taste of the drug before they even get there! (Source: Childress, Cravings Revealed by Brain Scans)23[/content_box_blue] Why is this important?

Because environmental cues and emotional distress can hamper progression…

Not all triggers can be avoided, but they must be managed! [content_box_blue width=”75%”]Researchers observed as animals chose to self-administered drugs over regular behaviors. Researchers discovered that these animals learned to associate certain stimuli and details of their environment to the drug-taking. The animals preferred to be in areas where they were previously given the drug, even days after it was removed. ( Source: Deroche-Gamonet,Evidence for Addiction like Behavior in the Rat)24 [/content_box_blue] Similarly, human addicts are “cued” to the sight of a beer bottle, a cigarette, or snack foods and sweets…

This is why developing proper coping skills to manage addiction is a primary component to long-term success. [divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]lie 3 addicts are[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

Addiction Does Not Come Down To The Strength Of One’s Will

Addiction was thought to only affect those that are weak-willed. But addiction does not discriminate.

It affects the poor and the rich, the successful and unsuccessful. Medical doctors, as well as homeless transients, easily become addicted to alcohol or drugs.

Additionally, the last 50 years of research shows that addiction causes functional and structural changes in the brain, perpetuating common addiction problems. [content_box_blue width=”75%”]The University of Oxford found that behavioral problems in youth offenders did not stem from lack of will-power or personality traits, but that there was a biochemical deficiency in addicts. This biochemical deficiency needed to be restored. Once treated with correct minerals and vitamins, criminal offenses reduced by 25 percent. (Source: Gesch, British Journal Of Psychiatry)25[/content_box_blue] Scientists know that addition is not just a mental condition, but has biochemical underpinnings that throw off brain structures, feeding common addiction problems.

Because the brain is thrown off it’s natural homeostatic state, addicts value the emotional payoff from their drug of choice over it’s seemingly rational and negative consequences. [content_box_blue width=”75%”]Dr. Grant, Medical director of Tully Hill Hospital reported 83 percent success in treating people with addictions by addressing the biochemical deficiencies. Dr. Grant and colleagues showed certain nutrients can restore the imbalance that continues to fuel addiction. Once it is fixed, behavior improves. (Source: Grant, Journal of the American Dietetic Association)26 [/content_box_blue][divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

The “Team Of Rivals” Brain

Neuroscientists have called the brain a “Team of Rivals” because it is a multiple structured system in which different structures “fight” against each other for dominance. For the brain to operate properly, it must be at balance.27

TOA_Hyde[content_box_blue width=”75%”]Addictive behaviors involving drugs or pornography work on the emotional system. While the rational brain structure competes to warn the individual of the consequences of such behaviors.28 [/content_box_blue]This explains why many addicts feel as if there is a different part to them – a part that desperately wants to quit, while the other part strongly urges them to continue.[content_box_blue width=”75%”]Addiction is a pathological problem in which the user’s brain is imbalanced to the point where the emotional and impulsive side dominates the rational side. This is why addicts often seek the short-term emotional benefits of the addictive experience, over the long-term negative consequences.29 [/content_box_blue]Family members of addicts often describe their loved one as a Mr. Jekyll and Dr Hyde, because addicts often exhibit sudden mood changes and erratic behaviors.

Addicted animals will display similar behavior…[content_box_blue width=”75%”]Drugs presented to animals will make them stop their normal behaviors, such as eating.  In one study, animals pressed a lever hundreds of times just for one single dose! This exhaustive effort even increased when stress is induced, such as by foot shock.30[/content_box_blue]

Most addicts in recovery feel as if there is something strongly urging them to use their drug of choice, while another part of them is telling them not to.

As a result, addicts often experience a great deal of ambivalence...[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

lie 4 if you relapse..

[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]One of the most harmful types of doctrine to an addict is the idea that all the days, weeks, months or even years of sobriety didn’t mean a thing because he slipped.

This idea feeds discouragement, depression and despair – the very emotions that has shown to lead to relapse!31 [content_box_blue width=”75%”]Some brain changes, such as cell regeneration, occurred only after a couple weeks of sobriety.32 This shows the tremendous stride an addict has actually achieved. Additionally, research shows that those who obtain long-term sobriety, actually relapsed about 2-3 times.33[/content_box_blue] Don’t get too discouraged if you relapse. When it comes to addiction, persevering of the will is important…

Persevering of the will enlarges and increases capacity and through that capacity, change will follow.

Abstinence, even attempted abstinence, is success.[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

There Is No Such Thing As Having An Addictive Personality

You may have been told that addiction is part of you… But most research reveals that addiction has nothing to do with personality traits or character flaws.

[content_box_blue width=”75%”]This is in contrast with the common view that addicts have pernicious personality characteristics that are part of their condition. Denial is often regarded as a trait of alcoholics. In fact, extensive research has revealed few or no consistent personality characteristics among alcoholics, and studies of defense mechanisms have found that alcoholics show no different pattern from non-alcoholics. (Source: Miller, Motivational Interviewing)34[/content_box_blue]

You can beat that addiction no matter what you have been told… You are NOT set to fail…

[content_box_blue width=”75%”]Lesser-known techniques that focus on using evidence-based cognitive therapy techniques and key nutrients, have been shown to dramatically reduce substance abuse,35 stop smoking36 boost long-term sobriety rates to 92 percent37 and dramatically lessen, if not completely eliminate, symptoms of withdrawal.38[/content_box_blue]

Using proven research-backed methods, you can change…[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

lie 5[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]The Brain Is Malleable. It Can Be Changed, Formed, Remapped And Rewired.

Neuroplacicity (or brain placisticity) is a term used to describe the neural changes caused by changes in body injury, thinking patterns, emotions, environment and behavior.39

Neurons, which are cells in the brain, are not entirely connected…

When we have repetitive thoughts or behaviors, neural networks or pathways are created…

These pathways are created by neurons firing, or sending a signal to each other…

These neurons that fire together, they wire together…

But it’s also true that when neurons stop firing together, the connections between them become weak and a whole new set of thought patterns and behaviors can be created.

Through neural firing, behaviors are either strengthened or weakened…

It is important to know that the brain can change…

Just knowing that the brain can make dramatic changes, can help you! [content_box_blue width=”75%”]According to a 2007 study by Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, students who had suffering math scores were divided into two groups. One group was taught proper studying skills, while the other was taught about the brain and how it can change. They were taught about neuroplasticity, and because of it, their intelligence can improve. At the end of the semester, the group that was told their brain changes (as research proves) excelled farther than those who were taught proper study skills!40[/content_box_blue] Many group therapies tell addicts that they will always be an addict, that there is no cure and that they must deal with this terrible disease for the rest of their lives.

The brain can change and YOU can change.

You see, most people take medications or pills to feel better…

But medicating yourself with pills or drugs only temporarily change the brain’s chemistry…

It doesn’t change the neural pathways. This temporary chemical change only lasts as long as the drug is synthesized to last.

It is never permanent…
You’ll always have to take another pill, another drink or another smoke to make you feel better…
But when our neural pathways change, our brain chemistry changes along with it!41[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

lie 6 addicts are lazy and just don't care[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

Addiction boosts chemicals in the brain and overstimulates the brain’s reward system. The brain starts to anticipate this over-stimulation and starts to becomes less efficient because it thinks is is producing too many chemicals. [content_box_blue width=”75%”]The brain does this as a natural defense. The brain starts to anticipate over-stimulation, which causes changes in neurotransmitter activity and receptor availability.42 When dopamine receptors reduce, this affects the transmission of signals in the brain and their ability to receive messages.[/content_box_blue] As a result, addicts often combat this dulling of the reward center by taking more drugs This process is known to addicts as “tolerance.”

Addiction results in an increasing desire for a diminishing pleasure… [content_box_blue width=”75%”]When the brain is continually and artificially stimulated with chemicals from drugs or other addictive behaviors it results in this building up of tolerance. Once the addict doesn’t have their “drug of choice,” it results in a depletion of neurotransmitters in the brain causing feelings of depression, confusion, irritability and fatigue.43[/content_box_blue]This is why addicts start to take drugs to feel good, but end up taking them just to feel normal.
[content_box_blue width=”75%”]Continued “exposure alters the functioning of those neurons, which in turn alters the functioning of the neural circuits in which those neurons operate.” (Source: Nestler, Molecular and cellular basis of addiction).44[/content_box_blue] But by using certain nutrients the brain can restore to proper balance…[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

Evidence-Based Ways To Restore Depleted Neurotransmitters

There are evince-backed ways to replenish depleted neurotransmitters and rewire the brain back to proper homeostasis.

For example, by the intake of amino acids that are derived from proteins you can boost neurotransmitter activity in the brain.

When the neurotransmitters are corrected it has a positive impact on the function and structure of the brain…

Neuroplasticity (neurons changing) and neurogenisis (the birth of new neurons) occurs throughout human life. Some practices change the brain at a remarkable level. [content_box_blue width=”75%”]Neuroplasticity can happen beginning with molecular changes caused by learning or even large-scale cortical changes that actually remap the brain, such as from brain injury. Studies show that environment and cognition can alter the connectivity of neurons.45Neurogenisis (the birth of new neurons) also occurs46and some practices, such as mindful meditation, cognitive-behavioral therapy can make a profound effect on the brain. [/content_box_blue] The most successful methods that produce long-term sobriety are scientifically proven techniques that build and rewire the brain. [divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

Lie 7 most people[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]Cravings Simplified And Demystified

Addicts call the seductive pull for their drug, a craving. Scientists call it a cue. Non-addicts might call it a temptation.

Whatever you call it, science has revealed what actually happens when we are experiencing these seductive pulls.

Initially, a craving will start with a stimulus. The stimulus (something that elicits a response) can either be internally generated (such as a thought) or externally generated (such as a seeing a beer bottle).

The stimulus triggers a sequence of events within the brain which usually results in an external action (behavior).

Scientists understand that both thoughts and environmental cues actually boost dopamine (the “feel good” chemical) in the brain resulting in desire for more. [content_box_blue width=”75%”]Dr. Childress, psychiatrist and researcher, used PET scans on participants to view neural activity. What she discovered was that when an addict experiences a craving, the brain releases a burst of dopamine “similar to a small dose of the drug itself, that is why some people report tasting the drug in the back of their throats, even though they really haven’t taken any. ”

Dr Childress says that the trigger “is a primer, a seductive pull.” She goes on to say that the trigger that addicts experience actually gives them “a small taste of the drug itself before they even get there.”47[/content_box_blue] But these cravings are really false messages that have been strengthened over and over again…

Cravings grow by indulgence…

The first step into managing cravings is to realize that these intrusive thoughts and feelings are not you.

Because you had a craving doesn’t mean your “morally wrong” or “weak-willed.”

Your not a bad person for having urges or intrusive thoughts that pop into your mind. But you CAN make the empowering decision how to react to them.

You see, most people, when they feel these intense cravings like they need to take a drink or a smoke, they either give in or try to suppress it.

But research shows that suppressing or fighting cravings actually makes matters worse.48

And this is what 90 percent of people do!

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The Only Proven Ways To Eliminate Cravings, Urges And Intrusive Thoughts

You can use methods that are scientifically proven to decrease intrusive thoughts and cravings and also rewire your brain out of destructive habit loops.

Studies show that the methods I speak about also help an addict to make proper decisions, and better manage their emotions.49

It is important to know how to manage emotions because science has repeatedly shown that relapse is mostly caused  by emotional states, not physical cravings as once thought.50

But this method is not advertised…

It would probably put all those expensive and high-end rehabs out of business because you can’t make money off of it.

It is something anyone and everyone can do and have access to.

It uses principles of mindfulness meditation and cognitive-behavioral therapy…

These techniques have been shown to train the brain and rewire the brain out of destructive habits and is backed by research. [content_box_blue width=”75%”]One method uses what is called the “non-reactivity principle.” Most people, when they have a craving or an intrusive thought, try to suppress it or fight it. Research shows that suppressing and fighting cravings actually strengthens the craving because it comes from the survival part of the brain (the limbic system) and is very powerful.

The non-reactivity principle, teaches to just observe the cravings as you have them. Just acknowledge them. Assess them. Have a third person perspective about them. And if done properly, what you will find is that cravings will leave quickly.

This is because you have now changed the relationship between you and those cravings. Instead of reacting, you observed. Focusing on it and analyzing it, makes it diminish. You may soon find that cravings will lessen in intensity and frequency, because your brain is changing. An added benefit is that you may discover you have greater cognitive control.[/content_box_blue] Practicing these techniques can be very empowering![divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

Lie 8

[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]What many people do not realize, is that the extent to which we interact with an addict can either motivate them to change or strengthen their resistance. In fact, research suggests that people can have a profound on others. The resistance during recovery is powerfully affected by how the people within the addict’s inner circle, interacts with them.51

[content_box_blue width=”75%”]When problem drinkers were randomly assigned to two different therapist styles (given by the same therapist), one confrontational-directive and one motivational-reflective, those in the former group showed substantially higher levels of resistance and were much less likely to acknowledge their problems and need for change. The addict’s resistance patterns were, in turn, predictive of less long-term change. (Source: Miller, Enhancing motivation for change in problem drinking)51[/content_box_blue] Similarly, researchers had therapists switch back and forth between conventional styles of interacting with individuals with addiction problems and a lesser-known method. These two styles demonstrated that an addict’s resistance and noncompliance went up and down markedly with the therapist’s own behavior, indicative of conventional interaction with an addict.52[content_box_blue width=”75%”]“People can dramatically influences an addict’s defensiveness, which, in turn, predicts the degree to which the loved one will change” (Source:  Patterson and Forgatch,Therapist behavior as a determinant for client noncompliance )53[/content_box_blue]

This is in contrast with the common view that addicts are always resistant because of denial.[content_box_blue width=”75%”]“People with addiction problems do not generally possess high levels of denial and resistance. These behaviors are more a function of the interpersonal interactions that occur during treatment. An important goal in Motivational Therapy, then, is to avoid evoking loved one resistance”(Miller, Enhancing motivation for change in problem drinking).54[/content_box_blue]

Said more bluntly, an addict’s resistance can be more of a therapist/family member’s problem. How you respond to resistant behaviors is one of the defining characteristics of evoking change.

You may think the addict doesn’t know how to speak to you, but research suggests what is more important is how you speak to them!

[content_box_blue width=”75%”]A first rule of thumb is never meet resistance head on. Certain kinds of reactions are likely to exacerbate resistance, back the loved one further into a corner, and elicit anti-motivational statements from the loved one (Source: Miller & Jackson, “Not listening” and “Listening”).55[/content_box_blue][divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

Lie 9 nutrition is not important..[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

Proper Nutrition Has Been Shown To Boost Success Rates To 92%!

Nutrients Restore Depleted And Malfunctioning Neurotransmitters – Chemicals In The Brain

Onlookers may only see the addict’s behavior, while researchers examine what is going on inside the addict’s brain. Researchers determined that addicts have malfunctioning and depleted neurotransmitters.

Neurotransmitters are the basis of how we think, act and behave. Research shows that once it is corrected, addicts think, act and behave in completely different ways. [content_box_blue width=”75%”] Dr Charles Grant, physician and psychiatric consultant stated, “unless the biochemical imbalances which are the true causes of substance problems are corrected, the benefits of psychological counseling will be marginal for most people (Dr. Charles Gant Psychiatric Consultant & Physician).[/content_box_blue] According to Dr. Grant, addicts have many allergies and food sensitivities caused by alcohol and drug abuse… [content_box_blue width=”75%”] “Removing specific allergens from their diets.. are often significant keys to restoring the emotional and biochemical foundations necessary for recovery.”56[/content_box_blue] Alcoholics are especially at risk for health problems which continue to feed cravings… [content_box_blue width=”75%”]”Experience shows that when an alcoholic succeeds in getting off alcohol, he usually substitutes sweets. This is because almost all alcoholics are hypoglycemic and sugar provides the same temporary lift that alcohol once did.” (Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution)”57[/content_box_blue] Most recovering addicts seek simple sugars and junk food in effort to give them a quick dopamine boost that their drug initially provided, But this causes dramatic blood-glucose levels to fluctuate. [content_box_blue width=”75%”]“While the diagnosis of hypoglycemia may be mistakenly used by people to explain unrelated psychological and emotional problems, there is no question that the great majority of alcoholics suffer from chronic low blood sugar. When given the 5-hour glucose tolerance test, over 95 percent of both early- and late-state alcoholics experience a spike in blood sugar after intake of sugar and then a rapid plunge.”(Source: Milam &  Ketcham, Under the Influence)”58[/content_box_blue]

The reason that using certain nutrients is so successful is because it restores the biochemical imbalances in the brain and body that are caused by addiction…

[content_box_blue width=”75%”]Most addicts eat very poorly because their brain has been switched to desire highly processed and refined sugars and may actually put yourself at greater risk for relapse.58[/content_box_blue] But by replacing foods with key nutrients leads to long-term success…

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Lie 10a

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In the Truth Of Addiction printable guide, you’ll discover the evidence-based techniques that produces successful change…

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By using these key nutrients, you will also feel a huge improvement in your mood…

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– By A. Scott Roberts
M.S. studies in Rehabilitation Counseling
Addiction Specialist and Researcher

– A. Scott Roberts

P.S. The sooner you take action, the quicker you will come to understand addictions and manage them, instead of “them” controlling you. Please don’t dismiss this opportunity because there are certain scams on the internet and “self help” guides that contain outdated information which is not backed up by research. Please let me put your worries at rest. I know that this system can help anyone who is willing to give it a try. Remember the 100% money back guarantee assures my confidence in this system.

P.P.S. The price of this system is a drop in the bucket compared to all the expensive options out there.

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